Vincent’s Starry Night

Vincent’s Starry Night: Sip some wine whilst you paint and have enjoyable fun recreating your own version of Vincent’s Starry Night or simply copying his masterpiece.

Sip some wine whilst you paint and have enjoyable fun recreating your own version of Vincent’s Starry Night or simply copying his masterpiece.

We’ll start with a quick chat about the background to the work – how he created it, what paints he used and what brushes.

Sip some wine whilst you paint and have enjoyable fun recreating your own version of Vincent’s Starry Night or simply copying his masterpiece.

Then off we go. The choice is yours: freestyle, using a template, a grid or simply paint in the line drawings with your own colour choices. Easy to follow instructions and guidance, suitable for all skill levels.

Sip some wine whilst you paint and have enjoyable fun recreating your own version of Vincent’s Starry Night or simply copying his masterpiece.

Whatever method you choose, by the end of the evening you’ll have your own masterpiece to take home.

Sip some wine whilst you paint and have enjoyable fun recreating your own version of Vincent’s Starry Night or simply copying his masterpiece.

All materials are supplied. You might want to bring your own protective gear e.g. an old apron or shirt.

Whether you are an artist, a beginner, an improver or just like to enjoy painting for pleasure, this is for you.

Vincent’s Starry Night

Brockenhurst Village Hall: Tuesday June 4 2024

18.30 – 21.00

The ARC Winchester: Friday June 7 2024

18.30 – 21.00

(https://www.arcwinchester.org.uk/event/arc-after-dark-starry-night-paint-and-sip-cafe-vino-da-vinci)

art-tales.org/vincent-how-did-he-do-it

Vincent – How did he do it?

First of all, he tinted his canvas thus avoiding the stark white canvas. He usually used fellow ochres or blues.

He used a limited palette with minimal colours.

He resisted the urge to blend his colours on his pallet.

He laid his paint on very thickly in most places, and with quick applications.

Vincent used short flat strokes with a filbert brush and many of his strokes are angular.

Where he wanted such effect, he mixed the paint on his canvas.

Notice that many of his strokes lead the eye and appear to ‘move’.

Texture was achieved using crosshatching. Short, quick, vertical, and horizontal lines with different colours. This again helped to create the illusion of movement.

Vincent employed the technique of outlining many of his subjects in darker colours.

Fat over thin: layering using a thin layer first then adding lots of colours in succession.

The Post Impressionism movement (which Vincent has been labelled as belonging to) led to the art movement called Fauvism – striking colours and not necessarily realistic e.g., red grasses and yellow trees etc.

And that’s basically how Vincent van Gogh achieved the wonderful works that we today admire and identify with so much.